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Moskito Guard

Why should I choose Moskito Guard®?

Moskito Guard® helps protect you from biting insects such as mosquitoes, ticks and fleas in the UK and abroad. It’s DEET-free formula is kinder to your skin, with 20% Picaridin, the active ingredient, proven to be as effective as DEET. The repellent is moisturising, non-greasy and water-resistant with a pleasant fragrance, and is suitable for pregnant women and children over 2 years of age. Moskito Guard® is available in a spray and wipes.

What type of insects / mosquitoes does Moskito Guard® protect against?

Moskito Guard® is proven to protect against bloodsucking insects around the world including mosquitoes, fleas and ticks.

How do I use Moskito Guard®?

Shake before use. Apply evenly on all exposed skin. Do not spray directly onto the face. Spray into the palm and smooth over skin, avoiding contact with lips and eyes. Reapply to the face and body every 8 hours without exceeding:

  • 2 applications maximum per day for children aged between 24 months and up to 12 years of age.
  • 3 applications maximum per day for children over 12 years of age and adults, including pregnant women.

Is Moskito Guard® suitable for children?

Moskito Guard® is suitable for children 2 years of age and over.

Is Moskito Guard® suitable for pregnant women?

Yes, Moskito Guard® is suitable for pregnant women throughout their pregnancy and even through breastfeeding.10

Is Moskito Guard® suitable for sensitive skin?

Moskito Guard® doesn’t cause irritation nor sensitisation. It’s a water based product that is created without paraben. However, although Moskito Guard® has been developed to decrease allergy risks, some components may cause sensitivities in those with an evident allergic background – Hexyl Cinnamal, Limonene and Linalool.

Is Moskito Guard® suitable for my pets?

Moskito Guard® is not a veterinary product. Moskito Guard® is intended to be used on human skin only. We suggest you discuss with your veterinary surgery about how best to protect your pet against biting insects.

Can Moskito Guard® be used on my clothes?

Moskito Guard® is not intended to be applied to clothing.

Can I use Moskito Guard® with sun tan cream?

Moskito Guard® can be used with sun tan cream but tests have not been undertaken to understand whether this affects the effectiveness of the repellent.

Does Moskito Guard® smell?

Unlike DEET-based insect repellents, Moskito Guard® has a pleasant fragrance, rather than a strong chemical type odour.

How long will Moskito Guard® protect me for?

Moskito Guard® will provide protection for up to 8 hours on the 3 most common Genus of Mosquitoes (Anopheles, Aedes and Culex).

How often can I re-apply Moskito Guard®?

Moskito Guard® should be re-applied every 8 hours, without exceeding:

  • 2 applications maximum per day for children aged between 24 months and up to 12 years of age.
  • 3 applications maximum per day for children over 12 years of age and adults, including pregnant women.

Do I need to re-apply Moskito Guard® after swimming or sports?

Moskito Guard® is water-resistant and sweat proof so doesn’t need to be re-applied after short swimming (less than 30 minutes) or sports, unless it was last applied more than 8 hours previously.

What are the active ingredients in Moskito Guard®?

Moskito Guard® contains 20% Picaridin which is recommended by Public Health England, Travel Health Pro, World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Will Moskito Guard® damage or mark my clothes?

Tests indicate that Picaridin, the active ingredient in Moskito Guard®, will not significantly damage your clothes. However, caution should be taken with delicate fabrics.

Are there any side effects from Moskito Guard®?

To date, no side effects have been reported by consumers or authorities. We recommend you use Moskito Guard® according to the instructions label.

What should I do if I suffer a reaction from Moskito Guard®?

Some people have had a mild skin irritation from using products containing Icaridin, such as Moskito Guard®, although this is very uncommon.11,12

However, Moskito Guard® may cause substantial but temporary eye injury in rare cases. Do not apply to eyes, lips or wounded skin. If contact with eyes occurs, hold the eye open and rinse gently with water for 15-20 minutes.  Contact a Poison Control Centre or a medical professional for treatment advice.

In the event of a skin reaction, wash thoroughly with soap and water after handling, returning indoors, and before eating, drinking, chewing gum, or using tobacco. Discontinue use and consult a medical professional if irritation or rash occurs.

If swallowed, contact medical professional or Poison Control Centre immediately for treatment advice. Sip a glass of water if able to swallow. Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so by a Poison Control Centre or a medical professional.13

What products are available in the Moskito Guard® range?

Moskito Guard® is available as a 75ml spray and packs of 15 wipes, which can be purchased at selected pharmacies and clinics.

Can I take Moskito Guard® in hand luggage on the plane?

Yes, under current legislation both the spray and wipes can be taken in the hold of an aeroplane as they are not pressurised.

How effective is Moskito Guard®?

The World Health Organization and Public Health England’s UK malaria prevention guidelines report 20% Picaridin, the active ingredient in Moskito Guard®, demonstrates excellent repellent properties comparable to, and often superior to, those of DEET.

Moskito Guard® is efficient up to 8 hours against Asian Tiger mosquito in the toughest lab conditions, one of the most aggressive mosquito species on the World.

Active Ingredients – Picaridin vs DEET

What is DEET?

DEET contains N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide and is the active ingredient in many common insect repellents. It can be directly applied to skin and clothes and is available in a variety of forms and percentages of concentration.1

What is Picaridin?

20% Picaridin is an insect repellent which is similar in effectiveness to recommended concentrations of DEET but more pleasant to use and much less likely to cause skin irritation.2,14

What is the difference between Picaridin, Saltidin® and Icaridin?

All three products contain the same chemical compound, Hydroxyethyl isobutyl piperidine carboxylate. Picaridin, Saltidin® and Icaridin are different trade names, which depend on the country in which they are referenced and the company which manufactures the compound.15

Mosquitoes and Disease

Where and when are mosquitoes prevalent?

Mosquitoes and other biting insects can be found worldwide.

What diseases do mosquitoes spread?

Mosquitoes are carriers of various diseases including but not limited to Chikungunya, Dengue Fever, Japanese Encephalitis, Lyme Disease, Malaria, Tick-Borne Encephalitis, Yellow Fever and Zika Virus.

These diseases can have life-threatening and life-changing implications and it is recommended that you use insect repellent to help protect yourself from mosquitoes and the associated diseases.

For further travel health advice, please visit:

Fit For Travel

Foreign Travel Advice

For guidance on mosquito bite avoidance for travellers, please click here

How many types of mosquito are there?

There are more than 3,000 species of mosquitoes in the world, but the members of three species are known to be responsible for spreading human diseases. Anopheles mosquitoes are the only species known to carry Malaria. They also transmit filariasis (also called elephantiasis) and Encephalitis. Culex mosquitoes carry Encephalitis, Filariasis, and the West Nile Virus. Aedes mosquitoes, of which the voracious Asian tiger is a member, carry Yellow Fever, Dengue, Japanese Encephalitis and Zika Virus.

What types of mosquito can be found in the UK?

There are 34 recorded mosquito species in the UK. Although most bite humans, the most common mosquito in Britain is Culex pipiens, which feeds on the blood of birds, not humans. Mosquitoes in this country are not currently known to transmit any infections to humans.

Why do mosquitoes bite me?

Mosquitoes respond to heat, movement and carbon dioxide from our bodies. Male mosquitoes do not bite people, female mosquitoes need human blood to develop fertile eggs and so need to bite to feed.

How can I protect myself from mosquitoes?

It is recommended that you:

  • Use insect / mosquito repellent
  • Wear light-coloured loose fitting long sleeve tops and trousers / skirts to reduce the exposed skin
  • Shut windows, doors and screens from dusk until dawn
  • Use mosquito nets

For guidance on mosquito bite avoidance for travellers, please click here

When should I use insect repellent?

Insect repellent can be used whenever insects are present and it is recommended that you use it when mosquitoes may be present to reduce the risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases such as but not limited to Chikungunya, Dengue Fever, Japanese Encephalitis, Lyme Disease, Malaria, Tick-Borne Encephalitis, Yellow Fever and Zika Virus.

Do I need malaria tablets?

Malaria tablets are recommended when travelling to malaria endemic areas. Research your destination and seek professional advice at least 6 weeks before travelling.

For further travel health advice, please visit:

knowmalaria

Fit for Travel

Foreign Travel Advice

What should I do if I am bitten?

In the case of a normal reaction, a hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion will provide relief from itching. A cold pack, ice cubes or a cool bath without soap may help relieve symptoms as well. For more serious allergic reactions, the following treatments may be used:

  • oral antihistamines
  • topical anti-itch lotion or benzocaine
  • a cool bath without soap
  • an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen) to carry on-hand in case of anaphylaxis

Zika virus

All travellers should seek advice from a healthcare professional at least 6 – 8 weeks ahead of travel, particularly if you are pregnant or planning pregnancy.16

UK/MG/0316/0003a March 2016